Butchering 1

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  • Familiarity with the skeletal structure is vital to good butchering. We begin with the neck...
  • To remove the neck make a square cut to the back bone just below the fold of the shoulder and neck...
  • and then saw off the neck. Clean all bone dust from both surfaces. Any bloody meat should be removed from under the neck at this stage as this will be discoloured and deteriorate quickly if left on the neck.
  • Shoulder block removal. The shoulder blocks are removed from the main part of the carcass by opening the seam indicated by the arrow on the picture and following the shape of the blade bone
  • Gently pull away the fore leg and the seam opens allowing better access. Care should be taken not to cut into under lying muscles. follow down the gap between the solid tissue...
  • The blade bone is the pale shape directly under the fingers of left hand...working down behind the blade bone... Once completed the process is repeated on the other side of the carcass
  • shoulder block muscle group: A: inner blade − diced;  B: feather – diced and casserole; C: blade – diced and casserole; D: thick rib of LMC – braising steaks; E: clod − mince; F: fore shin – shin and mince; G: flat blade – diced and mince<br />
  • boning out the shoulder
  • using a knife to remove forequaters
  • continuing with a knife after sawing the backbone
 
butchering 1: Familiarity with the skeletal structure is vital to good butchering. We begin with the neck...
butchering 1: Familiarity with the skeletal structure is vital to good butchering. We begin with the neck...
 

Introduction

  • The carcass should be skinned as soon as it has been lardered.* The carcass should then remain hung in the larder initially to enable the heat to dissipate from the carcass slowly in the first 6 hours after skinning. This will ensure the full and rapid onset of rigor mortis and will prevent ‘cold shortening’ of the soft muscles in the carcass. The carcass should then be hung in a chilled environment with good air flow at 0° to 4° C for up to 10 days to ensure tenderness and the desired maturation level. There should be no contact with other carcasses and skinned carcasses should be hung separately from any that are unskinned .* Whether primary cuts are made with the carcass suspended (as shown) or lying flat on a cutting table will be down to individual experience and preference.
  • Begin by ensuring that all work areas, equipment and hands are clean

Neck removal

  • The shoulder blocks are removed from the main part of the carcass by opening the seam indicated (figs. 2 & 3) and following the shape of the blade bone.
  • The shoulder block consists of three sections containing the blade bone, humerus bone and the fore leg. To prepare the shoulder, these are removed separately starting with the blade bone (fig.5). Once completed the process is repeated on the other side of the carcass. The shoulder block can be further broken down into smaller cuts (fig.4).

Forequarter removal

  • Make an incision between the 5th and 6th rib (counting from the neck end), saw through the sternum bone (fig.6).
  • Make a square cut to the backbone and then saw through the backbone keeping the saw in line with the ribs. Take care to only saw through bone and not into the underlying muscles on the opposite side of the carcass.
  • Follow the saw cut with a steak knife following the rib to remove the pair of forequarters by sawing through the sternum on the other side of the carcass (fig.7). Make sure that all bone dust is removed from both surfaces.

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